Trust by Hernan Diaz

Long-listed for the Booker Prize, Trust by Hernan Diaz took the country by storm over the summer. With interviews on NPR, reviews in the Times, and various other mediums of publicity crossing the age range, Trust has been a book read by most and can be by all. With all of that being said though, what makes this story unique is not the story itself but the method it is told.

However, without revealing the important aspects of the plot too much, let me clarify by saying that some people do find this story to be shocking. Unheard of, a complete surprise to one’s better judgements. And to that, I shall say, those that have found this story shocking are those with the privilege to never hear tales like this before. It’s a very specific subject of privilege that people are born into, such as race, gender, and financial stability.

So, for many readers, the story is not a shocking one. The manner in which it is told, a collection of perceptions on one family, is. We see the story that has been bastardized by the press, the story from the husband’s perspective, one from the ghostwriter, and one from the wife. Who’s perceptions of the depression and the great financial gains of one Wall St. family is the most accurate?

My assumption, however, is readers outside of the subsect of privilege will assume the true story early on in the book. But that doesn’t make Trust an unenjoyable book, just an unsurprising one. So will you be picking-up Diaz’s latest work?

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